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Offline Odessa

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Nur so
« am: März 26, 2008, 16:20:39 Nachmittag »
March 18, 2008
Australian Geologist Accidentally Discovers Meteor Crater in Google Earth
Geologist Arthur Hickman now has a meteor crater named after himself. He discovered Hickman Crater while looking for likely places to find iron ore in mountains in the western part of Australia. He sent a screenshot and the coordinates over to a colleague at Australian National University who later confirmed it is a well-perserved meteor crater between 10,000 and 100,000 years old. via ScienceAlert. You can see the crater in Google Earth here , or look at it with Google Maps.

This is not the first crater discovered with Google Earth. Two years ago a huge crater was discovered in the Saharan Desert with Google Earth.

If you want to start searching for craters in Google Earth, you might want to load this super-collection showing placemarks of known and suspected meteor craters on Earth . There are several folders which show various datasets of craters and some show the size of the craters as well. Also, be aware that not all things that look like meteor craters are. Besides the obvious volcano craters, there are other geological objects which appear as meteor craters but are not. Read this article from NASA.


Offline Odessa

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Re: Nur so
« Antwort #1 am: März 26, 2008, 16:27:39 Nachmittag »
O.h, und hier noch mit Links



March 18, 2008
Australian Geologist Accidentally Discovers Meteor Crater in Google Earth
Geologist Arthur Hickman now has a meteor crater named after himself. He discovered Hickman Crater while looking for likely places to find iron ore in mountains in the western part of Australia. He sent a screenshot and the coordinates over to a colleague at Australian National University who later confirmed it is a well-perserved meteor crater between 10,000 and 100,000 years old. via ScienceAlert. You can see the crater in Google Earth here , or look at it with Google Maps.

This is not the first crater discovered with Google Earth. Two years ago a huge (http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2006/03/huge_crater_dis.html) crater was discovered in the Saharan Desert with Google Earth.

If you want to start searching for craters in Google Earth, you might want to load this super-collection showing placemarks of known and suspected meteor craters on Earth . There are several folders which show various datasets of craters and some show the size of the craters as well. Also, be aware that not all things that look like meteor craters are. Besides the obvious volcano craters, there are other geological objects which appear as meteor craters but are not. Read this article (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/NewImages/images.php3?img_id=17378.)from NASA.


 

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