Autor Thema: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres  (Gelesen 43095 mal)

Offline karmaka

  • Administrator
  • Foren-Gott
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 5536
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #135 am: Oktober 04, 2011, 18:15:45 nachm. »
Gestern wurden Ergebnisse der Dawn-Mission auf dem "EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011" in Nantes, Frankreich vorgestellt. http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/epsc-dps2011/sessionprogramme

Interessant sind die vorläufigen Ergebnisse zum Alter der Krater auf Vesta und zur Heterogenität des Oberflächenmaterials:

Zitat
The difference in the number of craters between the two hemispheres is also striking. By counting the number of craters per unit area in different terrains, the relative ages of these different terrains can be obtained. Preliminary results of these crater age dates indicate much younger ages for areas in the south versus the north, as young as 1-2 billion years old. So far, the oldest ages, in the northern hemisphere, are younger than 4 billion years old, which is an unexpected result given that meteorites from Vesta have ages of 4 billion years. However, the crater counts will be refined with the more detailed data to be collected, and the assumptions about how the impact flux decays with time will be evaluated, so the absolute ages are preliminary.

Zitat
The surface of Vesta shows striking diversity when viewed in false colours that are ratios of light intensity at different wavelengths. These false colour variations are diagnostic of different surface materials. The spectral variations are particularly strong around craters.

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-10-dawn-vesta-massive-mountains-rough.html


Dies ist auch sehr interessant:


Zitat
The Dawn team has widely publicized the most obvious and riveting feature in the image—a giant, central crater, first glimpsed at low resolution by the Hubble Space Telescope, that scientists suspect is the origin of a common class of meteorites that have fallen to Earth. But at the bottom of the image, Dawn researchers see the faint outline of what they believe to be a second, older crater, says team leader Chris Russell of the University of California, Los Angeles. Half the rim of this apparent crater has been eradicated by the later, bigger impact (see the craters outlined in the picture http://blogs.nature.com/news/vesta.jpg ).

If the presence of this second, more ancient depression is confirmed, it’s likely to reveal secrets about a turbulent time in the early history of the inner solar system, says Russell. During that era, which began roughly 4.1 to 4.2 billion years ago, the asteroid belt was a much more crowded and rowdy place, with collisions between the space rocks much more likely.

If the larger, more obvious crater dates from the tail end of the Late Heavy Bombardment era, some 3.8 billion years ago, the smaller depression might hail from the middle of that highly active era, around 200 million years earlier, says Russell. If so, the diameter, depth and other properties of the depression — data still being deciphered — could provide a first indication of just how crowded and rowdy the belt was, says Dawn researcher Paul Schenk of the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas. Schenk and other members of the Dawn team plan to report some of their preliminary conclusions on 12 October at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Minneapolis, Minnesota. [...]
The possibility of a second large, elderly crater may also tie together models about the structure of the early asteroid belt and the inner solar system. At the Nantes meeting on 5 October, William Bottke of the Southwest Research Institute will unveil a model of the asteroid belt in which this reservoir of space rocks, now sandwiched between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, originally extended closer to the sun, to about 1.8 times Earth’s distance from the star.

The theory itself is an extension of the so-called Nice model that relies on the movement of the giant, outer planets to explain the early activity of the inner solar system. The model proposes that the outer planets didn’t form where they now reside, but in a game of planetary billiards, Jupiter moved inwards and Saturn and Uranus got pushed outwards due to gravitational interactions with an outer reservoir of space debris. The inward migration of Jupiter, the big bully of the solar system, stirred up the rocks in the asteroid belt, making them more likely to collide with each other and triggering the Late Heavy Bombardment era. The giant planet’s movement would also have cut the belt to its current width.

This model correctly predicts the early cratering history of the moon, but the oldest gouges on Vesta could provide an additional test of the theory. A high-resolution gravity map of Vesta, based on the motion of the Dawn craft as it flies over different parts of the asteroid, could provide the ultimate proof of whether one of these extremely ancient craters has already been found, says Russell.

http://blogs.nature.com/news/2011/10/dawn_mission_revealing_secrets.html

Hier gibt es viele der ersten Ergebnisse noch einmal gesammelt zur ausführlichen Lektüre:

Dawn at Vesta: Early Results

oral program: http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2011/oral_program/8866

poster program: http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2011/poster_program/8866

 :hut:

Martin
« Letzte Änderung: Oktober 04, 2011, 19:05:23 nachm. von karmaka »

Offline boborit

  • Generaldirektor
  • *
  • Beiträge: 1005
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #136 am: Oktober 04, 2011, 20:23:52 nachm. »
Danke Martin, :hut:

hier habe ich auch noch etwas gefunden. :user:

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=34838

Grüße - Michael :prostbier:
Nur der Himmel und du selbst können dir Grenzen setzen.

Offline karmaka

  • Administrator
  • Foren-Gott
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 5536
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #137 am: Oktober 05, 2011, 10:32:13 vorm. »
Hier noch eine Zusammenfassung der Dawn-Mission als Animation:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jObKH4Pa7ac

 :hut:

Martin

Offline karmaka

  • Administrator
  • Foren-Gott
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 5536
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #138 am: Oktober 12, 2011, 22:15:30 nachm. »
Das neueste über DAWN:

Die NASA 'news conference' von heute mit den neuesten wissenschaftlichen Daten:

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/17833902

Sehr interessant  :super:

NASA's Dawn: The Science of Vesta  

NASA participated in a news conference on Wed., Oct. 12, at 10 a.m. PT (1 p.m. ET) to discuss progress of the Dawn mission at giant asteroid Vesta. The briefing was hosted by the Geological Society of America in Minneapolis.

The news conference panelists are:

Carol Raymond, Dawn deputy principal investigator, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
Paul Schenk, Dawn participating scientist, Lunar Planetary Institute, Houston
Debra Buczkowski, Dawn participating scientist, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Md.
Federico Tosi, Dawn Visible and Infrared Spectrometer team member, Italian Space Agency, Rome

Zitat
Dawn, which has been orbiting Vesta since mid-July, has found that the asteroid's southern hemisphere boasts one of the largest mountains in the solar system. Other findings show that Vesta's surface, viewed by Dawn at different wavelengths, has striking diversity in its composition, particularly around craters. Science findings also include an in-depth analysis of a set of equatorial troughs on Vesta and a closer look at the object's intriguing craters. The surface appears to be much rougher than most asteroids in the main asteroid belt. In addition, preliminary dates from a method that uses the number of craters indicate that areas in the southern hemisphere are as young as 1 billion to 2 billion years old, much younger than areas in the north.

Scientists do not yet understand how all the features on Vesta's surface formed, but they did announce today, after analysis of northern and southern troughs, that results are consistent with models of fracture formation due to giant impact.
 http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/feature_stories/science_team_early_results.asp

 :hut:

Martin

PS: Die Journalisten im Saal haben aber erstaunlich wenig Fragen.  :gruebel:

« Letzte Änderung: Oktober 12, 2011, 22:45:33 nachm. von karmaka »

Offline karmaka

  • Administrator
  • Foren-Gott
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 5536

Offline herbraab

  • Generaldirektor
  • *
  • Beiträge: 1876
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #140 am: Oktober 27, 2011, 22:45:07 nachm. »
In der aktuellen Ausgabe  (November 2011) des Magazins "Sky & Telescope" gibt es einen Artikel zum Thema - mit einem Bild von einem Meteoriten, das mir irgendwie sehr bekannt vorkommt...  :auslachl:

:hut:
Herbert
"Daß das Eisen vom Himmel gefallen sein soll, möge der der Naturgeschichte Unkundige glauben, [...] aber in unseren Zeiten wäre es unverzeihlich, solche Märchen auch nur wahrscheinlich zu finden." (Abbé Andreas Xaverius Stütz, 1794)

Offline karmaka

  • Administrator
  • Foren-Gott
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 5536
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #141 am: Oktober 27, 2011, 22:51:20 nachm. »
Ja, so sieht er ihn wieder... :einaugeblinzel:

Sie ist klein, die 'Meteoritenwelt'!

Ein wunderschönes Exemplar!  :super:

 :hut:

Martin

Offline boborit

  • Generaldirektor
  • *
  • Beiträge: 1005
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #142 am: Oktober 29, 2011, 13:42:47 nachm. »
Hallo Vesta-Freunde,

hier das Impaktbecken auf Vestas Südseite als "key components" :user::

http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/slide3_image.jpg

war doch noch nicht... oder? :gruebel:

Grüße - Michael
Nur der Himmel und du selbst können dir Grenzen setzen.

Offline boborit

  • Generaldirektor
  • *
  • Beiträge: 1005
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #143 am: November 22, 2011, 18:11:36 nachm. »
Hallo Vestarianer, :hut:

als kleine Erinnerung mal wieder ein Link zur Vesta.

"Auswurfmassen des Schneemannkraters" http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imageoftheday/image.asp?date=20111121

Vielleicht sind bei diesem Auswurf auch einige von Vestas Sprösslingen auf ihrem Weg zu uns gebracht wurden... :gruebel:

Michael :prostbier:
Nur der Himmel und du selbst können dir Grenzen setzen.

Offline karmaka

  • Administrator
  • Foren-Gott
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 5536

Offline karmaka

  • Administrator
  • Foren-Gott
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 5536
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #145 am: Dezember 13, 2011, 16:52:38 nachm. »
Dawn ist nun in den niedrigsten Orbit (low altitude mapping orbit) um Vesta eingeschwengt und umkreist den Asteroiden
nun für mindestens 10 Wochen in einer durchschnittlichen Höhe von nur noch 210 km, um z.B. das Gravitationsfeld genauer zu messen.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/dawn/news/dawn20111212.html

Parallel dazu wird diskutiert, ob Vesta als "Smallest Terrestrial Planet", d.h. als Zwergplanet, gelten könnte:

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2011/09dec_vestaplanet/

 :hut:

Martin

Offline karmaka

  • Administrator
  • Foren-Gott
  • *****
  • Beiträge: 5536
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #146 am: Dezember 31, 2011, 11:02:25 vorm. »
Wissenschaftler der Nasa arbeiten zur Zeit an der "meteorite-mountain connection", d.h. der chemischen Zuordnung der HED-Meteoriten zum South Polar Krater auf Vesta.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2011/30dec_spacemountain/

South Polar Krater als berechnetes Bild: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/dawn/multimedia/pia14869.html

 :hut:

Martin

Offline boborit

  • Generaldirektor
  • *
  • Beiträge: 1005
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #147 am: Dezember 31, 2011, 12:17:20 nachm. »
Hallo Martin, :hut:

na super :super: dann wissen wir ja bald mehr über die Herkunft der HED-Sprösslinge :wow:

Wollen wir doch annehmen, das Vesta sich zu ihren "Kindern" bekennt... :fluester:  :einaugeblinzel:

Michael :prostbier:
Nur der Himmel und du selbst können dir Grenzen setzen.

Offline lithoraptor

  • Foren-Veteran
  • *
  • Beiträge: 3929
  • Der HOBA und ich...
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #148 am: Dezember 31, 2011, 12:36:06 nachm. »
Moin!

Wollen wir doch annehmen, das Vesta sich zu ihren "Kindern" bekennt...

Ich hoffe bzw. denke, dass sie sich nicht zu allen bekennen wird können. Das macht die Sache dann ungleich faszinierender, wie ich finde. :fluester:

Gruß und EUCH ALLEN einen GUTEN RUTSCH!

Ingo

Offline boborit

  • Generaldirektor
  • *
  • Beiträge: 1005
Re: Dawn-Mission zu Vesta und Ceres
« Antwort #149 am: Januar 11, 2012, 19:51:01 nachm. »
Hallo Vestarianer,

hier mal was Neues von "Dawn".

Kraterketten auf der (4) Vesta.

 http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imageoftheday/image.asp?date=20120111

Michael :winke:
Nur der Himmel und du selbst können dir Grenzen setzen.

 

   Impressum --- Datenschutzerklärung