Autor Thema: Die steinzeitliche Meteoritik der australischen Aborigines  (Gelesen 4451 mal)

Offline karmaka

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Re: Die steinzeitliche Meteoritik der australischen Aborigines
« Antwort #15 am: Dezember 07, 2011, 17:04:06 nachm. »
Hier noch ein kleiner Film über Mineralien und Australian Aborigines

Aboriginal Use of Rocks and Minerals

http://museumvictoria.com.au/melbournemuseum/discoverycentre/dynamic-earth/videos/aboriginal-use-of-rocks-and-minerals/

Transkript:

Zitat
In Central Australia, there were three kinds of ochre used in the main. They were yellow ochre, white ochre – or white pipe clay – and red ochre. One of the most widely used ochres was red ochre, which was extensively used on the body. And in some particular mines in Central Australia, the ochre has a mica component, and when it’s placed on the body, particularly on the face, it gives off quite a shiny look. And that’s still used today in ceremonies, and is traded all around Central Australia and beyond.

Here’s an example of an object that utilises both stone and ochre. It’s a stone knife; it was collected over 100 years ago by Baldwin Spencer in Tennant Creek. And as you can see, the blade is made out of a quartzite, and the handle part is painted with red ochre, white pipe clay and charcoal. This was used for cutting up meat, but primarily used for ceremonial purposes, for cutting the body or in ritualised fighting.

These stone implements are rather unique, they’re called Kimberley points and in pre-contact times they were used for cutting the body, for decorative purposes, or in some cases in initiation ceremonies. Now in post-contact times, when people came in contact with glass bottles, electrical insulators, plates, they switched from stone and started using glass, and they’re still made today in the Kimberleys.

Aboriginal people in Central Australia also used stone to process foods. They get a very very fine seed, they place it in the lower part of the grinding stone, they get the top grinding stone and they grind it for maybe 20 minutes. Then they get a fine flour, mix the flour with water, and once it’s mixed with water they create a fine paste and that’d be baked on the fire for half an hour or so; and they get these small, thick pancake-type sort of cakes. And they could be taken on travels for a couple of days or eaten straight away.

The woomera is a very interesting tool. Of course it was primarily used for throwing spears; the spear was held by a peg at the back of the spear-thrower and then launched at the kangaroo. But it was also used as a cutting implement, both for cutting meat and for chiselling wood. And in the handle of the woomera there was a piece of quartzite that was glued into the handle using spinifex resin.

The woomera is a fantastic example of the way in which Aboriginal people used the available resources, both stone and wood, in a very, very efficient way to survive in what is perhaps the most arid part of Australia. With one of these, a man could survive and feed his family.

 :hut:

Martin

Offline karmaka

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Re: Die steinzeitliche Meteoritik der australischen Aborigines
« Antwort #16 am: September 05, 2014, 15:03:14 nachm. »
Comet and Meteorite Traditions of Aboriginal Australians
Duane W. Hamacher

aus: Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures, 2014.
Edited by Helaine Selin. Springer, Netherlands

arXiv:1409.1563
submitted 3 Sep 2014

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Zitat
Of the hundreds of distinct Aboriginal cultures of Australia, many have oral traditions rich in descriptions and explanations of comets, meteors, meteorites, airbursts, impact events, and impact craters. These views generally attribute these phenomena to spirits, death, and bad omens. There are also many traditions that describe the formation of meteorite craters as well as impact events that are not known to Western science.

Offline karmaka

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Re: Die steinzeitliche Meteoritik der australischen Aborigines
« Antwort #17 am: September 05, 2014, 16:10:17 nachm. »
More Accounts of Meteoritic Events in the Oral Traditions of Indigenous Australians
Duane W. Hamacher

Archaeoastronomy  –The Journal  of  Astronomy  in  Culture,  Vol. 25, in press
(Submitted on 27 Aug 2014)
arXiv:1408.6368

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Zitat
Descriptions of natural events, such as fireballs and meteorite impacts, are found within Indigenous Australian oral traditions. Studies of oral traditions demonstrate that they extend beyond the realm of myth and legend; they contain structured knowledge about the natural world (science) as well as historic accounts of natural events and geo-hazards. These traditions could lead to the discovery of meteorites and impact sites previously unknown to Western science. In addition to benefiting the scientific study of meteoritics, this study can help social scientists better understand the nature and longevity of oral traditions and further support the growing body of evidence that oral traditions contain historical accounts of natural events. In a previous study led by the author in 2009, no meteorite-related oral traditions were identified that led to the discovery of meteorites and/or impact craters. This paper challenges those initial findings.

Using Modern Technologies to Capture and Share Indigenous Astronomical Knowledge

N.M. Nakata, D.W. Hamacher, J. Warren, A. Byrne, M. Pagnucco, R. Harley, S. Venugopal, K. Thorpe, R. Neville, R. Bolt

Australian Academic & Research Libraries, Vol. 45(2), pp. 101-110
(Submitted on 4 Sep 2014)

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Indigenous Knowledge is important for Indigenous communities across the globe and for the advancement of our general scientific knowledge. In particular, Indigenous astronomical knowledge integrates many aspects of Indigenous Knowledge, including seasonal calendars, navigation, food economics, law, ceremony, and social structure. We aim to develop innovative ways of capturing, managing, and disseminating Indigenous astronomical knowledge for Indigenous communities and the general public for the future. Capturing, managing, and disseminating this knowledge in the digital environment poses a number of challenges, which we aim to address using a collaborative project involving experts in the higher education, library, and industry sectors. Using Microsoft's WorldWide Telescope and Rich Interactive Narratives technologies, we propose to develop software, media design, and archival management solutions to allow Indigenous communities to share their astronomical knowledge with the world on their terms and in a culturally sensitive manner.

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Offline Mettmann

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Re: Die steinzeitliche Meteoritik der australischen Aborigines
« Antwort #18 am: September 08, 2014, 18:24:24 nachm. »
Humm..

"Indigenous", Monika, haben wir doppelt und müssen wir 5mal abziehen.
Aber "Indigenous" macht dann in Schilling immer etwas (aus den Fördertöpfen).

Ich gebe zu bedenken, daß in unserer orientalisch-hellenistisch-jüdisch-christlich-islamischen indigenen Tradition, die seit 3000+ Jahren zu guten Teilen verschriftlicht und somit weitaus stabiler ist als mündliche Überlieferungen, solch punktuelle sekunden-/minuten dauernden Ereignisse wie Meteore, Feuerkugeln, Impaktereignisse gar, (mit ausnahme eines widerständigen neo-keltischen Dörfleins im Chiemgau)
in Mythen, Legenden, Volksglauben praktisch überhaupt nicht existent sind.

Kalendarik, Nahrungserwerb, Navigation, Götterwesen alles keine Frage, gibt ja kaum ein Völkchen, daß die astronomischen Grundlagen nicht entdeckt und verwendet hätte,

aber reichhaltige Meteoritenbezogene Überlieferungskultur,
das halte ich pers. für modisch-romantische Esoterik.*

 :prostbier:
Mettmann

(der, wenn er mal Zeit hat, den archaischen Tanz der indigenen Schoaßlgnalzer, pardong der eingeborenen südbaierischen Goaßlschnalzer auf einen überlieferten rituellen Zauber zur Abwehr von Steinschauern als Reflex auf den Chiemgau-Impakt ableiten wird).

*"Es riecht nicht alles gut, was kracht." - K.Valentin
"If any of you cry at my funeral,
I'll never speak to you again."
(S.Laurel 1890-1965)

Offline karmaka

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Re: Die steinzeitliche Meteoritik der australischen Aborigines
« Antwort #19 am: Mai 21, 2020, 10:33:08 vorm. »
Soeben veröffentlicht:

From Wolfe Creek to Tunguska - Meteorites in Cultural Traditions

Filmed by Robert Cross. Interview by Mike Flattley. Produced by the Royal Society of Victoria with support from the Inspiring Australia program.

VIDEO (Langfassung)

"The "falling stars" hold a significant place in the traditions of Indigenous cultures around the world, including Australia. From meteors, fireballs, and airbursts to meteorites, tektites, and impact craters, these objects and events are described in story, song, dance, and material culture. From the famous Tunguska explosion of 1908 to the ancient impact that formed the Henbury craters, many events were witnessed by Indigenous people and incorporated into their oral traditions - some leading scientists to previously unknown impact sites and meteorite finds.

Indigenous Knowledges senior lecturer Dr Tyson Yunkaporta (Deakin University) and cultural astronomer A/Prof Duane Hamacher (The University of Melbourne) take us on a journey to impact sites and meteorite finds across the globe. See first release video of traditional cultural dances relating to fireballs (as permitted by traditional elders) and gain insights to the cultural and spiritual role of sky events in Indigenous Australian traditions.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that this presentation may contain the images and voices of deceased persons."

Offline karmaka

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Re: Die steinzeitliche Meteoritik der australischen Aborigines
« Antwort #20 am: Mai 21, 2020, 11:19:25 vorm. »
Der Dokumentarfilm 'Fireball' von Werner Herzog und Clive Oppenheimer wird auch kurz erwähnt.

Offenbar befindet sich der Film immer noch in der 'post-production' und einen Termin für die Veröffentlichung scheint es ebenfalls noch nicht zu geben.  :nixweiss:

Offline hugojun

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Re: Die steinzeitliche Meteoritik der australischen Aborigines
« Antwort #21 am: Mai 21, 2020, 12:13:01 nachm. »
Ein Beitrag nach meinem Geschmack,
er entspricht meiner Auffassung zur Interpretation der Darstellung der Nebra Himmelsscheibe.
Vielleicht entwickelt sich hier in Europa eine wissenschaftliche Disziplin aus Archäologie , Astronomie und Planetenkunde im Sinne dieses Beitrages und ich kann meine Interpretation der Himmelscheibe von Nebra
mal einem Komitee von Wissenschaftlern vorstellen, die sich der Sache annehmen wollen.
Die klassische Archäologie hat die bisherige Interpretation der Astronomie widerspruchslos übernommen.

https://www.jgr-apolda.eu/index.php?topic=12546.msg149675#msg149675

Gruß
Jürgen






 

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