Autor Thema: METEORITEN PODCASTS  (Gelesen 21199 mal)

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #30 am: August 25, 2012, 00:10:54 vorm. »
Interview mit Michael Rankin,
dem 'Prairie Meteorite Searcher 2012',
über seine systematische Suche nach vermutlich gefallenen Meteoriten des Meteors vom 14.7.12
in der Nähe von Suffield im Südosten von Alberta, Canada
(CBC Alberta, Canada 23.8.12)

http://www.cbc.ca/albertaatnoon/episode/2012/08/23/prairie-meteorite-searcher/

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #31 am: September 26, 2012, 07:47:59 vorm. »
Vielleicht interessiert diese französische Radioreportage einige von euch:

Ein Besuch im Labor des Kosmochemikers Prof. Matthieu Gounelle von Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle in Paris

http://www.cieletespaceradio.fr/son/857_arbregenealogiquesoleil_gounelle.mp3

http://www.cieletespaceradio.fr/un_arbre_genealogique_pour_le_systeme_solaire.881.SYST_001

Zitat
Un arbre généalogique pour le système solaire
Système solaire, mis à jour le 25/09/2012

L'arbre généalogique du système solaire prend racine !
Selon une étude des chercheurs Matthieu Gounelle et Georges Meynet, portant sur les météorites, le Soleil serait le fils d\'une étoile unique au moins trente fois plus massive que lui et apparue quelques millions d'années avant sa naissance. Décryptage avec le professeur Matthieu Gounelle, qui nous a reçu dans son bureau du Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, à Paris.
Martin

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #32 am: September 27, 2012, 00:09:53 vorm. »
Météorites, pierres voyageuses

Ein Gespräch (in Französisch) mit Brigitte Zanda und Albert Jambon (57 Minuten, France Culture, 24.9.2012, 53.6 MB)

(4:21 und 48:43 Min. Laufzeit)

http://rf.proxycast.org/m/media/296096201420.mp3?c=culture&p=CONTINENT+SCIENCES_16256&l3=20120924&l4=&media_url=http%3A%2F%2Fmedia.radiofrance-podcast.net%2Fpodcast09%2F16256-24.09.2012-ITEMA_20403203-0.mp3

streaming: http://www.franceculture.fr/player/reecouter?tools=podcast&content=4503885

http://www.franceculture.fr/sites/default/files/imagecache/ressource_full/2012/09/25/4507709/Albert%20Jambon%20et%20Brigitte%20Zanda.jpg

Zitat
Longtemps la rationalité a refusé de croire que les météorites étaient des pierres tombées du ciel. C’était des émanations telluriques. Puis, en particulier avec le physicien Chladni, l’origine extraterrestre des météorites - et leur arrivée, souvent spectaculaire - s'est imposée. Ces messagères du Cosmos sont, aujourd’hui, des objets d’investigation scientifique importants. Elles permettent de remonter le temps. Elles constituent notre principale source d’information sur la formation du Soleil, des étoiles et de leur cortège planétaire. De nombreuses disciplines les étudient. Elles forment aussi l’une des plus remarquables collections du Muséum. Les météorites sont à notre ordre du jour aujourd’hui.

 :hut:

Martin
« Letzte Änderung: September 27, 2012, 00:29:49 vorm. von karmaka »

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #33 am: September 27, 2012, 14:17:12 nachm. »
Ein englischsprachiges paper zum Interview in Beitrag #31
gibt es übrigens hier:

http://arxiv.org/pdf/1208.5879v1.pdf

Solar system genealogy revealed by extinct short-lived radionuclides in meteorites von Matthieu Gounelle und Georges Meynet
in Astronomy & Astrophysics, Volume 545, id.A4, 2012

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #34 am: Oktober 19, 2012, 10:46:38 vorm. »
5 x 5 Minuten 'Steine, die vom Himmel fallen'

Christian Köberl gab in dieser Woche auf Ö1/ORF
kurze allgemeine Einblicke in die Welt der 'Steine, die vom Himmel fallen'

http://oe1.orf.at/vomlebendernatur#

stream:

Teil 1: Sternschnuppe und Feuerball:
http://oe1.orf.at/konsole?show=ondemand&track_id=317365&load_day=/programm/konsole/tag/20121015

Teil 2: Größenunterschiede mit dramatischen Auswirkungen
http://oe1.orf.at/konsole?show=ondemand&track_id=317426&load_day=/programm/konsole/tag/20121016

Teil 3: Gesteine von Mars und Mond
http://oe1.orf.at/konsole?show=ondemand&track_id=317481&load_day=/programm/konsole/tag/20121017

Teil 4: Ein Umdenken in der Forschung
http://oe1.orf.at/konsole?show=ondemand&track_id=317586&load_day=/programm/konsole/tag/20121018

Teil 5: Die Katastrophe am Ende der Kreidezeit
http://oe1.orf.at/konsole?show=ondemand&track_id=317693&load_day=/programm/konsole/tag/20121019

podcast - Vom Leben der Natur: http://static.orf.at/podcast/oe1/oe1_natur.xml

 :hut:
Martin

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #35 am: Oktober 26, 2012, 21:37:28 nachm. »
Ein akustischer Nachschlag zu Tissint und zur Heritage Auction

NPR Radio, 12.10.12

MP3: http://public.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/atc/2012/10/20121012_atc_19.mp3?sc=16&orgId=1&forsearch=0&topicId=1026&ft=1&f=2100689&_kip_ipx=815838772-1351279465

Martian Meteorite For Sale Is A 'Little Time Capsule' by Christopher Joyce

http://www.npr.org/2012/10/12/162815210/martian-meteorite-for-sale-is-a-little-time-capsule?ft=1&f=2100689

Und wer kauft Meteorite?

Pitts Antwort:

Zitat
Most anyone who has an appreciation for the exotic, the romantic, anyone who wants to enthrall a child or anyone's sense of wonder. Radio hosts? Everyone.

TRANSKRIPT der Sendung:

Zitat
AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And now to one more rare thing that came from space: a meteorite. Some of the most unusual and prized meteorites fell to Earth from Mars. In a new journal article, scientists describe the latest one that was discovered, and this weekend, you can buy a piece of it. NPR's Christopher Joyce has this story of a journey from Mars to a Manhattan auction house.

CHRISTOPHER JOYCE, BYLINE: The meteorite is called Tissint, and it contains a unique story about Mars.

CAROLINE SMITH: Many people think that this meteorite may well be one of the most important meteorites that have actually fallen in the last century.

JOYCE: That's meteoriticist Caroline Smith at London's Museum of Natural History, which owns one of the biggest pieces of Tissint. She's one of the scientists who described it in the journal Science. Tissint's journey began as volcanic rock on the Martian surface. Smith says they can tell liquid washed over the rock and deposited bits of soil in it. Then an asteroid smacked into Mars and blasted the rock into space. In 2011, it flamed through the Earth's atmosphere and smashed into the Moroccan desert. Smith notes that while NASA's robot Curiosity is now driving around Mars, meteorite experts have the real thing.

SMITH: The thing is no matter how fantastic the robotic missions are, it's still not the same as being able to actually analyze a piece of rock in a laboratory on Earth. So the - I think the big message here is that the meteorite is almost ground-truthing what we're actually seeing on Mars.

JOYCE: Tissint is also special because the impact that blew it off Mars melted part of its surface into smooth, black glass. That trapped bubbles of Martian atmosphere and elements inside. Also, its fragments were found quickly, so it hasn't been too contaminated by elements on Earth. Scientists have just begun to tease out its story.

SMITH: Whenever I pick up a meteorite, I get excited. Each of those stones is a little time capsule and a little space probe to actually help us understand how our solar system formed.

JOYCE: But the piece in London is just one of many that broke off Tissint as it hurtled through Earth's atmosphere. Where they ended up is a story that begins in Morocco. Meteorite scientist Hasnaa Chennaoui Aoudjehane had heard about the fireball in the sky. Last January, she traveled 700 miles from Casablanca, over the Sahara, to find the strewn field where pieces were spread across the sand. She was not the first one there.

HASNAA CHENNAOUI AOUDJEHANE: The first thing that I see is hundreds of people in the middle of nowhere, and this is something that I will never forget.

JOYCE: Men, women and children were camped out, hunting for the pieces. Meteorites are often found in North Africa - unusual rocks stand out in the desert - and they bring a good price. She brought some small pieces for her university in Casablanca. Professional dealers scooped up the rest. About that time, a meteorite collector and dealer in New York City named Darryl Pitt got a tip about pieces of Mars for sale. Pitt got money from investors. A Moroccan dealer sold him a piece, dispatching his au pair to fly with it to New York City.

DARRYL PITT: Immediately after she clears customs, she reaches into her purse and gives me a packet, and I'm looking around, looking at the cameras and thinking, oh, my golly, this is going to be a problem.

JOYCE: Not that it was illegal, but the transaction made it look like it. Pitt bought or brokered the sale of more pieces, including the one that went to London's Natural History Museum.

PITT: It's important to make the material available to scientists and researchers first and foremost.

JOYCE: The museum's Caroline Smith agrees that collectors and scientists do help each other.

SMITH: I would be not telling the truth if I said there was no tension with anything where large amounts of money is involved, but I would like to stress that, you know, on the whole, relationships are very good. It's a mutually beneficial arrangement in many cases.

JOYCE: On Sunday, a piece of Tissint will be offered at a meteorite auction in Manhattan. Pitt helped Heritage Auctions arrange it. He says the Martian meteorites are the stars because there are so few. All told, on Earth...

PITT: You're talking about, like, about 300 pounds of material. That's it. Mars is among the rarest substances on Earth.

JOYCE: The Tissint fragment at the auction starts at $230,000. As for potential buyers...

PITT: Most anyone who has an appreciation for the exotic, the romantic, anyone who wants to enthrall a child or anyone's sense of wonder. Radio hosts?

(LAUGHTER)

PITT: Everyone.

JOYCE: Christopher Joyce, NPR News.

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #36 am: November 13, 2012, 23:57:44 nachm. »
Meteorite man chats about his research

Zitat
Dr Richard Court, from the Department of Earth Science and Engineering, discusses his research on meteorites and how they can deliver important gases to kick-start life on planets. He also explains how they can release gases that can give off misleading signals to scientists searching for signs of life on distant worlds.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=EFtTrHyD7dc

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_12-11-2012-16-54-11

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #37 am: November 17, 2012, 19:23:00 nachm. »
Dr. Alex Ruzicka, der 'Assistant Professor in the Department of Geology' und 'Director of the Cascadia Meteorite Laboratory'
wird vom Portland State University Radio (KPSU) interviewt

MP3: http://meteorites.pdx.edu/Ruzicka-KPSUradiobroadcast.mp3  (54 MB, 58:59 Min. ; Interview ab 7:23 Min. Laufzeit)

Dr. Ruzickas Research Page: http://web.pdx.edu/~ruzickaa/research.htm

(Thanks, David!)

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #38 am: Dezember 14, 2012, 22:20:58 nachm. »

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #39 am: Januar 02, 2013, 19:11:57 nachm. »
Weiteres eingängiges 'Hörfutter' für Winterabende:

Wie gefährlich sind Asteroiden?
Gefahr aus dem Weltall?
Asteroiden, Kometen, Weltraumschrott

IQ Wissenschaft und Forschung
Von Klaus Uhrig
(Sendedatum: 25.1.2012)

download: (21 MB, 23:51 Min.) :
http://cdn-storage.br.de/mir-live/MUJIuUOVBwQIb71S/iw11MXTPbXPS/_2rc_71S/_-iS/_-rH_2NH/70c7e413-1a07-441c-b3f2-cf625e1b04e5_2.mp3

http://www.br.de/radio/bayern2/sendungen/iq-wissenschaft-und-forschung/gefahr-aus-dem-all100.html

http://www.br.de/radio/bayern2/sendungen/iq-wissenschaft-und-forschung/weltraum/asteroiden-kometen-weltraumschrott100.html

Die Radiosendung wird am 10.1.2013 um 18:05 Uhr auf Bayern 2 wieder ausgestrahlt

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #40 am: Februar 16, 2013, 18:03:02 nachm. »
"Luftzerplatzer" über Tscheljabinsk
DLF 15.2.13

Kleiner Meteroid zerbrach in etlichen Kilometern Höhe
Michael Khan im Gespräch mit Monika Seynsche

http://www.dradio.de/dlf/sendungen/forschak/2012712/

http://ondemand-mp3.dradio.de/file/dradio/2013/02/15/dlf_20130215_1636_7b346639.mp3


Asteroide und Meteoriten - was bedeuten sie für das Leben auf der Erde?
DLR 16.2.13

http://podcast-mp3.dradio.de/podcast/2013/02/16/drk_20130216_1106_0a3d34be.mp3

So ändert ein Ereignis das geplante Programm ein wenig.

Weekly Space Hangout - Feb 15 2013

This week we talk about the meteor that exploded over Russia, the close asteroid flyby, et cetera. We are joined by Ian O'Neill, Nicole Gugliucci, Thad Szabo, Nancy Atkinson, and Pamela Gay. Hosted by Fraser Cain.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/astronomycast/~5/9pDczACtixs/Weekly_Space_Hangout_Feb_15_2014.mp3


Kein flächendeckendes Frühwarnsystem für Meteoriten

Weltraumforscher über den Meteoriteneinschlag und den vorbeigeflogenen Asteroiden
Manfred Gaida im Gespräch mit Jürgen Zurheide

DLF, 16.2.13

http://www.dradio.de/dlf/sendungen/interview_dlf/2013003/

http://ondemand-mp3.dradio.de/file/dradio/2013/02/16/dlf_20130216_0650_db47ed9a.mp3
« Letzte Änderung: Februar 16, 2013, 18:21:28 nachm. von karmaka »

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #41 am: Februar 21, 2013, 22:16:43 nachm. »
Large Meteorite Impacts on Earth

University of Oxford, Stargazing (18.2.13)

Ken Amor looks at the science of large meteorite impacts on Earth.

http://media.podcasts.ox.ac.uk/physics/stargazing/2013-01-12_stargazing_ken_amor.mp4

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #42 am: März 30, 2013, 23:14:14 nachm. »
Dies kam gerade auf der Metlist und gehört natürlich in diesen Thread:

Studying Rocks Found On Earth For Clues About Space

AUDIO-LINK (NPR Radio, Talk of the Nation / Science Friday, 29.3.13, 10:27 Min.)

Zitat
Guests

    Meenakshi Wadhwa
    Director, Center for Meteorite Studies
    Professor, School of Earth and Space Exploration
    Arizona State University
    Tempe, Arizona

With samples from over 1,800 separate meteorite falls around the world, ASU's Center for Meteorite Studies claims the world's largest university-based meteorite collection. Meenakshi Wadhwa explains how meteorites can teach researchers about the history of the solar system.

Es gibt auch eine kurze Aussage über NWA 7325!

PS: Hier noch ein weiterer interessanter Beitrag aus der Sendung:

How Cosmic Collisions Have Shaped Our Solar System

Some of our solar system's landmarks can trace their origins to massive impacts.

AUDIO-LINK

Zitat
From the rocky fragments in Saturn’s rings to Earth’s own moon, our solar system bears signs of an ancient demolition derby. Planetary scientist Erik Asphaug describes the role of impacts in our planetary neighborhood, and looks ahead to a possible comet collision on Mars.

Erik Asphaug
Ronald Greeley Chair of Planetary Geology
School of Earth and Space Exploration
Arizona State University
Tempe, Arizona
« Letzte Änderung: März 30, 2013, 23:43:00 nachm. von karmaka »

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #43 am: März 31, 2013, 22:51:24 nachm. »
San Juan Capistrano - Ein fast vergessener Fall hatte kürzlich seinen 40. Falltag

Capistrano Meteorite

StarDate Podcast, 15.3.13

AUDIO-LINK

Zitat
The swallows are coming back to Capistrano. A celebration kicks off next week at the mission in San Juan Capistrano, where the little birds have migrated for decades.

Another visitor from above descended on the California town 40 years ago today: a meteorite - a rock from beyond Earth. It crashed into the aluminum roof of a carport and split apart. The owners found the biggest piece the next morning on the floor of the carport. They found a much smaller piece about a month later while cleaning the gutter.

The pieces didn't add up to much - only about two ounces in all. But the meteorite represents a treasure to scientists, because it helps them understand more about the early solar system.

The San Juan Capistrano meteorite is classified as a chondrite. That means it contains small bits of rock that melted then resolidified long ago. Chondrites probably formed at the same time as Earth and the other planets of the solar system. As a result, they may reflect the composition of the original cloud of dust from which the planets formed - four and a half billion years ago.

This meteorite is especially valuable because it was picked up within hours of landing, so scientists know it hadn't been changed by exposure to Earth's atmosphere. It should preserve a good sampling of the materials present at the birth of the planets - an important scientific gift that descended on a California town.

Weitere Informationen:

The San Juan Capistrano Meteorite - by R.C. Finkel and K.Marti

FOTO 1

FOTO 2

MetBull-Eintrag

Offline karmaka

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Re: METEORITEN PODCASTS
« Antwort #44 am: April 26, 2013, 19:02:38 nachm. »
Nicht im engeren Sinne meteoritisch, aber trotzdem eine interessante Stunde Hörgenuss:

DEEP TIME

Big Picture Science, 22.4.13

MP3-LINK (52 Min.)

Zitat
Think back, way back.  Beyond last week or last year … to what was happening on Earth 100,000 years ago.  Or 100 million years ago.  It’s hard to fathom such enormous stretches of time, yet to understand the evolution of the cosmos – and our place in it – your mind needs to grasp the deep meaning of eons. Discover techniques for thinking in units of billions of years, and how the events that unfold over such intervals have left their mark on you.
Plus: the slow-churning processes that turned four-footed creatures into the largest marine animals that ever graced the planet and using a new telescope to travel in time to the birth of the galaxies.

  Guests:

Jim Rosenau – Artist, Berkeley, California
Robert Hazen – Senior staff scientist at the Geophysical Laboratory at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, executive director of the Deep Carbon Observatory and the author of The Story of Earth: The First 4.5 Billion Years, from Stardust to Living Planet
Neil Shubin – Biologist, associate dean of biological sciences at the University of Chicago, and the author of The Universe Within: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, and People
Nicholas Pyenson – Curator of fossil marine mammals at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C.
Alison Peck – Scientist, National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, Virginia

 :hut:

Martin

 

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